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October 01 2013

Sadighgallery
Ancient Egypt. Terracotta sarcophagus painted with the four sons of Horus (Imsety, with head of a man; Hapy, with the head of a baboon; Qebehsenuef, with the head of a falcon; and Duamutef, with the head of a jackal). 18th Dynasty.
Sadighgallery
Ancient Egypt. Mummy mask made from linen and gesso and then painted. Entire face covered in gold leaf. On the front, two jackals and four snakes on either side. On the top, a winged eagle with two spears. On one side, standing Horus and Osiris, on the other, Anubis, and Horus with crown. Ptolemaic. 305-30 BC
Sadighgallery
Ancient Egypt. Linen mummified cat head, the domestic pet and symbol of Bastet (Bast) and Ra. Ptolemaic. 305-30 BC
Sadighgallery
Ancient Egypt. Male mummy mask with layers of linen over stucco. 18th Dynasty.
Sadighgallery
Ancient Egypt. Linen mummified bust. Ptolemaic. 305-30 BC
Sadighgallery
Ancient Egypt. Limestone canopic jar with stopper. Incised onto the front, three columns of hieroglyphs including birds and the sun God Ra holding an Ankh. On the stopper, Hapy, protector of the liver. Canopic jars were used by the Ancient Egyptians during the mummification process to store and preserve the organs of their owner for the afterlife. 18th Dynasty. 1570-1085 BC

September 24 2013

Sadighgallery

Ancient Egypt. Gold leaf over stucco and gesso, painted mummy mask fragment once used to cover the head of a mummy. Colors include soft red, black, browns and some green with black outlined eyes and eyebrows. Secured to a linen backing.

Ptolemaic, 305-30 BC

Sadighgallery

Ancient Egypt. Female mummy mask with layers of linen over stucco. Hollow in the back. In ancient Egypt, fine linen was used to wrap the head and neck of a mummy. The most well known type of Egyptian mask was made to cover the face of mummies. Egyptian mummy masks had religious significance. Masks were intended to help the dead move from the mortal to the immortal world and to protect the physical body from harm.

18th Dynasty, 1570-1342 BC

September 10 2013

Sadighgallery
Ancient Egyptian mummified bust. Ptolemaic, 305-30 BC.

Mummification is one of the oldest funerary practices in the world. It was especially prevalent in ancient Egypt. However, prior to 3400 BC, all Egyptians were buried in shallow pit graves regardless of their social status. They were buried on the edges of the desert, where the arid conditions created the natural mummification process.
As prosperity and the advance in building techniques improved, a more elaborate and complex process of mummification was introduced, especially for those of higher status.

August 16 2013

Sadighgallery
Ancient Egypt. Limestone Pesesh-Kef Wand, believed to be an instrument used to support the lower jaw of the corpse during ancient Egypt’s early embalming stage. At the top, a seated lion.

26th Dynasty, 663-525 BC

June 13 2013

Sadighgallery
Ancient Egyptian limestone canopic jar. On the stopper, Hapy, protector of the liver. Canopic jars were used by the Ancient Egyptians during the mummification process to store and preserve the organs of their owner for the afterlife. 18th Dynasty.

May 28 2013

Sadighgallery
Ancient Egyptian wooden mummy mask covered with gesso and painted in yellow ochre, black and red. Almond shaped eyes with cosmetic outlines. 26th Dynasty. 663-525 BC

May 17 2013

Sadighgallery
Ancient Egyptian limestone canopic jar. Incised onto the front, three columns of hieroglyphs including the sun God Ra holding an Ankh. On the stopper, Hapy, protector of the liver. Canopic jars were used by the Ancient Egyptians during the mummification process to store and preserve the organs of their owner for the afterlife. 18th Dynasty.
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